Courses

236 courses found when searching within the Fall 2021 semester.

page = 2

Intro-Web Page Design

ART 180

An introduction to concepts of web page and website design is provided in this course. Emphasis is on learning processes and techniques of software used in the World Wide Web design industry for creating effective interactive communication and on development of esthetic perception and good design judgment. 1 hr. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Prerequisite: Enrollment in this course is by advisement. The course is open to all qualified students.

Life Drawing/Anatomy I

ART 209

In this course students continue to develop drawing skills working exclusively from the human figure and anatomy. Emphasis is placed on the organization of line, value, mass, and structure through short gestural drawings and more developed longer drawings from live models and the human skeleton. Using a variety of traditional and experimental drawing media and techniques students develop a strong understanding of the human figure and its importance in art history and relevance to a visual arts training. Assistance will be given with the development of portfolios for transfer to 4-year art degree programs. This course is reserved for fine art majors. 1 hr. lect, 4 hrs. studio. Prerequisite: ART 104.

Advanced Studio I

ART 214

This is a capstone course in the Fine Arts curriculum where students will work on advanced level studio projects and learn how to produce a professional portfolio. Emphasis is placed on a series of independent projects developing personalized subject matter, with the guidance of faculty. 1 hr. lect.; 4 hr. studio. Pre-requisites: ART 103 & 104. Co-requisite: ART 209.

History of 20th Century Design

ART 220

This course will introduce the student to artists, engineers, designers, manufacturers, and consumers to establish a definition of design history in the 20th century The course will show the connections of the above mentioned via a broad interdisciplinary view of the economic, social, and esthetic values that determine a meaning for design throughout the century and how it may apply to the present. The course will cover numerous disciplines that include advertising, architecture, fashion, graphic design, industrial design, and performing and visual arts. An emphasis will be placed on the graphic arts and the consumer. Prerequisites: ART 107 & 108 or ART 109 & 110.

Graphic Design II

ART 262

The course covers professional and personal branding and identity campaigns, including logos/marks as well as an introduction to three‐dimensional package design using Adobe Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator. 1 hr. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite: ART 124 / Equivalent computer skills, Adobe Illustrator or by advisement.

Internship-Vis Arts/Graphics

ART 293

Students will be engaged in practical work experience within the areas of Visual Arts or Graphic Design. The parameters of the internship will be established between the student and the hosting organization under the department's supervision. A contract specifying hours and a method of evaluation will be signed by the parties with sufficient hours for the credits earned. This opportunity will be open to second-year students with the approval of the student's academic advisor and the department chairperson. Phone 687-5192 for further information.

Astronomy of Stars & Galaxies

AST 101

Designed for the non-science major, this course provides an introduction to the universe beyond the solar system. This course offers a study of the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the universe. Students must attend one night telescope observation on campus. 3 hrs. lect. Prerequisite or corequisite ENG 101.

Ancient Astronomy

AST 105

This online course will examine the earliest origins of astronomy. The first half of the course will introduce students to the movements of the Earth and other solar system objects; the phases and cycles of the Moon; the origin of seasons, solstices, equinoxes, and eclipses; constellations and celestial navigation; and how ancient civilizations developed our earliest calendars. The second half of the course will be a broad survey of the historical development of astronomy from ancient times up to the scientific revolution of the Renaissance Period. Cosmologies from representative cultures around the world will be examined along with significant archaeoastronomy sites including the Egyptian pyramids, Nabta, Stonehenge, Newgrange, Chichén Itza, Machu Picchu, Chaco Canyon, the Big Horn Medicine Wheel, and others. Corequisites: ENG 101 and MAT 105 or higher. 3 hrs. lect.

Fund Concepts of Biology

BIO 100

Designed for students who plan to study biology, nursing, or veterinary technology courses. This non-laboratory course covers topics from the basic principles of life through the cell concept. The course strengthens the student's in biology. Topics covered include cell reproduction, cell respiration, and classification. Students may not use this course to satisfy a science requirement or science elective.

Biology I-Non-Science Majors

BIO 101

Designed for the non-science major, this nonlaboratory course covers basic concepts such as the cell, principles of inheritance, and the species. Students study cell structure and function, DNA, cell division, and the kingdoms.

General Biology I

BIO 105

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence of BIO 105 and BIO 106. Topics of this lecture and laboratory course include the scientific method, evolution, basic chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism and enzymes, cellular respiration and photosynthesis, cell division, and genetics. The laboratory component includes microscope work, examination of preserved and living specimens, and performing experiments with emphasis on the scientific method. 3 hrs. lect; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite or corequisite ENG 101.

General Biology II

BIO 106

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence of BIO 105 and BIO 106. Topics of this lecture and laboratory course include a survey of the diversity of life: taxonomy and phylogeny of the prokaryotes, protists, fungi, green plants, and animals; an introduction to ecology; and a comparative survey of form and function in plants and animals. The laboratory component includes microscope work, examination of preserved and living specimens, and performing experiments with emphasis on the scientific method. It is recommended, but not required, that BIO 105 be taken before BIO 106. 3 hrs. lect; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite or corequisite ENG 101.

Human Anat & Physiology I

BIO 107

The normal structure and function of the human organism, beginning with basic biological principles and progressing through selected organ systems, are the focus of this course. Laboratory work emphasizes hands-on experiences using the microscope, models, and specimens. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite or corequisite ENG 101.

Human Anat & Physiology II

BIO 108

A continuation of BIO 107, this course covers the normal structure and function of selected organ systems. Laboratory work emphasizes human anatomy utilizing models, specimens, and cat dissections. Students enrolling in BIO 108 who are pregnant or breast-feeding should consult their advisors. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite: BIO 107. Prerequisite or corequisite ENG 101.

Human Biology

BIO 109

This is a non-laboratory biology course designed for the non-science major who has an interest in learning about the human body. Students will study the basic anatomy and physiology of major body systems and some common diseases associated with those systems. Special emphasis will be placed on topics of modern concern such as new diseases and new techniques for treating the human body. Students will be encouraged to learn to use information in this class for making informed personal and societal decisions.

Medical Terminology

BIO 111

This course presents a study of basic medical terminology. The primary purpose is for students to be able to analyze a word and determine its meaning and proper usage. The correct spelling of terms is also emphasized.

Microbiology

BIO 201

The study of microorganisms both beneficial and harmful to humans is covered in this course. Students learn taxonomy, structure, physiology, reproduction, ecology, and control of microbes. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite: One year of laboratory biology courses.

General Ecology

BIO 207

This lecture and laboratory course provides a broad introduction to the theory and practice of ecology: behavioral, population, community, and ecosystem ecology. An underlying theme of the course is the application of scientific methodology in the practice of ecology. Throughout, the role of applied ecology in addressing environmental problems is explored. The laboratory component includes field work in local Catskill habitats, which can involve collaboration with NYS DEP, and an individual, semester-long project. 3 hrs. lect, 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite: One year of laboratory college biology or by advisement.

Math for Bus & Industry

BUS 102

Students apply basic mathematics to situations encountered in business and industry. Emphasis is placed on solving word problems from a variety of topical areas including resource management, wholesale and retail pricing, payroll and accounting-related tasks, and simple and compound interest related applications.

Entrepreneurship

BUS 115

Students are introduced to the basics required for starting and operating a small business. Subjects include marketing, financing, legal structures, franchising, and managing employees. Students will apply terminology and concepts in developing a draft business plan.


page = 2
?> ©©©©©